Skylight

Archive for October 2007

Re: Let’s discuss a point in Sri Aurobindo at Cambridge by RY Deshpande on Wed 03 Oct 2007 04:18 AM PDT |  Profile |  Permanent Link

Sunayana makes an important observation in this article of hers. It is as follows:

As we were thanking the librarian for having allowed us to see the many valuable documents, he remarked that there aren’t very many young people who take up the Classical Tripos these days, even though the course has been slightly modified to adapt to the needs of our modern times. It is important to note that at the end of the 19th century studying the classics was a normal thing for people of the upper class to do. It wasn’t until relatively recently that people started to choose a line of study according to what they were planning to take up as a profession in life. In those days higher studies were meant more for training the mind to think rather than to acquire a job skill.

Mark the last sentence: “In those days higher studies were meant more for training the mind to think rather than to acquire a job skill.”

It looks to me that, in the Aurobindonian terminology, a shift from Maheshwari to Mahasaraswati has taken place. In the collective life perhaps this is good; but the pioneering spirit of man exploring the real unknown has taken a back seat.

It will be good if we can have discussion on this issue.

RYD

Re: …Sri Aurobindo at Cambridge by ronjon on Thu 04 Oct 2007 03:12 PM PDT |  Profile |  Permanent Link

Hi RY,

You say:

…“In those days higher studies were meant more for training the mind to think rather than to acquire a job skill.” It looks to me that, in the Aurobindonian terminology, a shift from Maheshwari to Mahasaraswati has taken place. In the collective life perhaps this is good; but the pioneering spirit of man exploring the real unknown has taken a back seat. …

I think it depends on which subculture we’re talking about. I agree with your view re the dominant subculture, at least in the United States. But, what intrigues me is that there is another subculture in the U.S., sometimes called the “alternative culture” or “Cultural Creatives.”

The latter term was popularized by the Canadian sociologist Paul H. Ray, the former Chief of Policy Research on Energy Conservation of the Canadian Department of Energy, Mines and Resources. Dr. Ray has surveyed and classified well over 100,000 Americans in the past thirteen years, showing how the subcultures of values permeate all aspects of American life. His best-selling book The Cultural Creatives summarizes this research and his website documents and updates his findings.

Dr. Ray says:

As of the year 2000, there are 50 million adults in the United States who have the worldview, values and lifestyle of the Cultural Creatives. (There are probably about 80-90 million Cultural Creatives in the European Union as well.)

I consider myself a member of the CC subculture, which btw, Dr. Ray also calls the “Integral Culture.” The fact that Dr. Ray is on the Board of Gaiam was one of the reasons I was interested in the acquisition of Zaadz by Gaiam.

~ ronjon


Tusar N. Mohapatra

Director, Savitri Era Learning Forum
SRA-102-C, Shipra Riviera, Indirapuram, Ghaziabad - 201014 (UP) India + 91 96500-65636
tusarnmohapatra@gmail.com
Aadhaar No. 3628 2075 7337
SELF posits a model of counselling and communicative action as an instrument in order to stimulate the public sphere. The model aims at supplementing the individual’s struggle for a successful social adjustment with more aspirational inputs so as to help one take an informed and balanced attitude towards life as well as society.
Savitri Era of those who adore,
Om Sri Aurobindo & The Mother.

Blog Stats

  • 30,578 hits